IPM Coalition

integrated pest management

Agile Methodology

Agile came about as a “solution” to the disadvantages of the waterfall methodology. Instead of a sequential design process, the Agile methodology follows an incremental approach.
Developers start off with a simplistic project design, and then begin to work on small modules. The work on these modules is done in weekly or monthly sprints, and at the end of each sprint, project priorities are evaluated and tests are run. These sprints allow for bugs to be discovered, and customer feedback to be incorporated into the design before the next sprint is run.
The process, with its lack of initial design and steps, is often criticized for its collaborative nature that focuses on principles rather than process.
 
Advantages of the Agile Methodology
1. The Agile methodology allows for changes to be made after the initial planning. Re-writes to the the program, as the client decides to make changes, are expected.
2. Because the Agile methodology allows you to make changes, it’s easier to add features that will keep you up to date with the latest developments in your industry.
3. At the end of each sprint, project priorities are evaluated. This allows clients to add their feedback so that they ultimately get the product they desire.
4. The testing at the end of each sprint ensures that the bugs are caught and taken care of in the development cycle. They won’t be found at the end.
5. Because the products are tested so thoroughly with Agile, the product could be launched at the end of any cycle. As a result, it’s more likely to reach its launch date.
 
Disadvantages of Agile Methodology
1. With a less successful project manager, the project can become a series of code sprints. If this happens, the project is likely to come in late and over budget.
2. As the initial project doesn’t have a definitive plan, the final product can be grossly different than what was initially intended.
 
When should you use Agile methodology?
1. When rapid production is more important than the quality of the product.
2. When clients will be able to chance the scope of the project.
3. When there isn’t a clear picture of what the final product should look like.
4. When you have skilled developers who are adaptable and able to think independently.
5. When the product is intended for an industry with rapidly changing standards.

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