IPM Coalition

integrated pest management

Toxicity classes

Click one of the letters above to advance the page to terms beginning with that letter.

A

Acute toxicity
Aquatic toxicity
Aquatic toxicity

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B

Bee toxicity
Bioaccumulative

Bioaccumulative and or Persistent

Bioaccumulative and mobile
Bird toxicity
Bird toxicity

Highly toxic to birds acute oral LD50 (LD50 < 200mg/bg bw)

Highly toxic to birds acute oral LD50 (LD50 < 200mg/bg bw)
BT

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C

Carcinogenic
Class II: toxic
Class II: toxic
Class III: harmful
Class III: harmful
Class IV : corrosive
Class IV : corrosive
Class V : irritant
Class V : irritant
Class VI : sensitizing
Class VI : sensitizing
Class VII : carcinogenic
Class VII : carcinogenic
Class VIII : mutagenic
Class VIII : mutagenic
Containing Dioxins

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D

Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EEC)

There are eight toxicity classes in the European Union's classification system, which is regulated by Directive 67/548/EEC.
Very toxic and toxic substances are marked by the European toxicity symbol.

The Dangerous Substances Directive[1] (as amended) was one of the main European Union laws concerning chemical safety, until its full replacement by the new regulation CLP regulation (2008), starting in 2016. It was made under Article 100 (Art. 94 in a consolidated version)[2] of the Treaty of Rome. By agreement, it is also applicable in the EEA,[3] and compliance with the directive will ensure compliance with the relevant Swiss laws.[4]

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dangerous_Substances_Directive_(67/548/EEC)

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E

EDC (C2 &amp; R2)
Endocrine disruptor

"An endocrine disruptor is an exogenous substance or mixture
that alters function(s) of the endocrine system and consequently causes
adverse health effects in an intact organism, or its progeny, or
(sub)populations"

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/chemicals/endocrine/definitions/endodis_...

Environmental Toxicity
EPA: Evidence of Non-Carcinogenicity for Humans
EPA: Human carcinogen
EPA: Not Classifiable as to Human Carcinogenicity
EPA: Possible Human Carcinogen
EPA: Probable Human Carcinogen
EU Cat. 1: endocrine disruptor

Priority list

It is intended that the priority list of chemicals developed within the EU-Strategy for Endocrine Disruptors will be used to prioritise further detailed review of the information. However, it is important that the listings produced are not regarded as final and unchangeable: addition and removal of chemicals may be required in response to either developments in scientific knowledge or changes in chemical usage patterns.

The priority list was to be established in two phases, first an independent review of evidence of endocrine disrupting effects and human/wildlife exposure and second a priority-setting exercise in consultations with stakeholders and the Commission Scientific Committees.

The different steps of the process include:

  • Step 1: A working list of chemicals was compiled from lists of 'suspected endocrine disruptors' published by various organisations, supplemented by a search of the scientific literature to identify reports and papers describing effects suggestive of endocrine disrupting activity for specific chemicals. To try to ensure that the list was as comprehensive as possible, a draft of the list was discussed at a meeting with key stakeholders (including representatives from government, industry and non-governmental organisations (NGOs)). Data on the effects of chemicals in humans, other vertebrates and invertebrates that might be due to endocrine disruption, were collected and included in a database to facilitate the analysis of findings. Information on each chemical's persistence in the environment and the likelihood that its levels might build up in exposed organisms (i.e. bioaccumulate) were also collected, where available.
  • Step 2: The available information was reviewed to identify those chemicals that might be either highly persistent in the environment (i.e. resistant to breakdown) or that are produced by industry at high volumes (HPV chemicals, i.e. more than 1000 tonnes each year) since, in either case, it was assumed that both humans and animals would be more likely to be exposed to them and, hence, to be at potentially greater risk to any harmful effects.
  • Step 3: Using expert advice, information on the subset of chemicals identified by Step 2 as either persistent or HPV chemicals were reviewed to determine the strength of evidence for endocrine disruption and chemicals were assigned to one of three categories: Category 1 - evidence of endocrine disrupting activity in at least one species using intact animals; Category 2 - at least some in vitro evidence of biological activity related to endocrine disruption; Category 3 - no evidence of endocrine disrupting activity or no data available. (In this priority-setting exercise Commission Scientific Committees and Stakeholders were consulted and considered that a differentiation between both categories should be done).
  • Step 4: For the chemicals assigned to Category 1 in Step 3 (i.e. those for which there was evidence of endocrine disrupting activity in at least one intact animal species), the available information was reviewed to decide, if it was possible, that humans or wildlife might actually be exposed. Highest concern was allotted to those where human or wildlife were expected to be exposed, medium concern related to those where humans were not expected to be exposed but wildlife could be, and lowest concern was scored for those where neither humans or wildlife were exposed.

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/chemicals/endocrine/strategy/substances_...

Extremely hazardous (Class WHO Ia)

WHO Class I – a: extremely hazardous

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F

Fatal if inhaled (H330)

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G

GHS carcinogen
GHS Human
GHS mutagenic
GHS reproductive

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H

Hazard to ecosystem services
Heavy metal
Highly hazardous (Class WHO Ib)

WHO class I – b: highly hazardous

Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHP)

Highly Hazardous Pesticides are defined according to the FAO/WHO Panel of Experts on Pesticide Management (JMPM). The JMPM, in their 2nd session in October 2008, recommended that highly hazardous pesticides should be defined as having one or more of the following characteristics:

1) Pesticide formulations that meet the criteria of classes Ia (extremely hazardous) or Ib (highly hazardous) of the WHO Recommended Classification of Pesticides by Hazard;

2) Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of carcinogenicity Categories 1A and 1B of the Globally Harmonized System on Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS);

3) Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of mutagenicity Categories 1A and 1B of the Globally Harmonized System on Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS);

4) Pesticide active ingredients and their formulations that meet the criteria of reproductive toxicity Categories 1A and 1B of the Globally Harmonized System on Classification and Labelling of Chemicals;

5) Pesticide active ingredients listed by the Stockholm Convention in its Annexes A and B, and those meeting all the criteria in paragraph 1 of Annex D of the Convention;

6) Pesticide active ingredients and formulations listed by the Rotterdam Convention in its Annex III;

7) Pesticides listed under the Montreal Protocol.

Honey bee toxicity
Human Toxicity

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I

IARC Group 1

Group 1: the agent (mixture) is definitely carcinogenic to humans. The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are carcinogenic to humans.

IARC Group 1

Group 1: the agent (mixture) is definitely carcinogenic to humans. The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are carcinogenic to humans.

IARC Group 2A

Group 2A: the agent (mixture) is probably carcinogenic to humans. The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are probably carcinogenic to humans.

IARC Group 2A

Group 2A: the agent (mixture) is probably carcinogenic to humans. The exposure circumstance entails exposures that are probably carcinogenic to humans.

IARC Group 2B
IARC Group 2B
IARC Group 3
IARC Group 3
IARC Group 4
IARC Group 4
IARC Human carciogenic
International Conventions
ISEAL IPM Coalition common ban

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L

Long term toxic effects

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M

Mammal toxicity
Mammal toxicity

Acute oral LD50 for most sensitive mammal species (LD50 < 200mg/kg bw).

Montreal Protocol Ozone depleting
Mutagenic

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N

Neonicotinoids

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O

Other environmental hazards

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P

PB
PBT
Persistent Organic Pollutants

Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are chemical substances that
persist in the environment, bioaccumulate through the food web,
and pose a risk of causing adverse effects to human health
and the environment. This group of priority pollutants
consists of pesticides (such as DDT), industrial chemicals
(such as polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs) and unintentional
by-products of industrial processes (such as dioxins and
furans).

Persistent Organic Pollutants are transported across international
boundaries far from their sources, even to regions where they
have never been used or produced. The ecosystems and
indigenous people of the Arctic are particularly at risk
because of the long-range environmental transportation and
bio-magnification of these substances. Consequently,
persistent organic pollutants pose a threat to the
environment and to human health all over the globe.

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/chemicals/international_conventions/inde...

PIC listed (Annex III)

 

http://www.pic.int/TheConvention/Chemicals/AnnexIIIChemicals/tabid/1132/...

PIC not yet recommended
PIC preparation
PIC recommended
PT

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R

REACH
REACH

Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) is a European Union regulation dated 18 December 2006.[1] REACH addresses the production and use of chemical substances,
and their potential impacts on both human health and the environment.
Its 849 pages took seven years to pass, and it has been described as the
most complex legislation in the Union's history[2] and the most important in 20 years.[3] It is the strictest law to date regulating chemical substances and will affect industries throughout the world.[4]
REACH entered into force on 1 June 2007, with a phased implementation
over the next decade. The regulation also established the European Chemicals Agency, which manages the technical, scientific and administrative aspects of REACH.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Registration,_Evaluation,_Authorisation_an...

REACH
REACH
Reported severe effects
Reproductive
Rotterdam Convention (PIC)

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S

SAN Aquatic risk
SAN Inhalation risk
SAN Pollinator risk
SAN Risk based list

The
SAN List of Pesticides for Use with Risk Mitigation defined by Oregon State
University. (SAN risk pesticide lists requiring Risk Mitigation)

SAN Terrestrial wildlife risk
Severe effects
Stockholm Convention (POP)

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W

WHO II

WHO Class II: moderately hazardous

WHO III

WHO III: slightly hazardous

World Health Organization (WHO)

The World Health Organization names four toxicity classes: Class 1 – a: extremely hazardous Class 2 – b: highly hazardous Class 3: moderately hazardous Class 4: slightly hazardous The system is based on LD50 determination in rats, thus an oral solid agent with an LD50 at 5mg or less/kg bodyweight is Class I-a, at 5-50 mg/kg Class I-b, at 50-500 mg/kg Class II, and at more than 500 mg/kg Class III. Values may differ for liquid oral agents and dermal agents.

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Z

ZZZZZZ parked

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